Pregnant Women Diet ebooks

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The Fertility Diet: Groundbreaking Research Reveals Natural Ways to Boost Ovulation and Improve Your Chances of Getting Pregnant
by Jorge Chavarro, Walter C. Willett, Patrick J. Skerrett

  • The first fertility-boosting guide to feature the cutting-edge research results on fertility from the Nurses’ Health Study
  • More than 6 million women in the United States alone experience infertility problems
  • User-friendly, medically approved advice clearly explained in 10 nutritional guidelines from two of Harvard Medical School’s top voices in nutrition

Your Vegetarian Pregnancy
by Holly Roberts

With this unique and accessible handbook, you can be confident that your vegetarian pregnancy will be wonderfully beneficial for both you and your baby.

Fulfilling every nutritional guideline recommended by the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Your Vegetarian Pregnancy is the first authoritative guide to maintaining a healthy plant-based diet before, during, and after the birth of your child.


What to Eat When You’re Pregnant
by Nicole M. Avena

A trimester-by-trimester guide to what to eat–as opposed to what to avoid–while pregnant and nursing, to support the mother’s health and the baby’s development during each stage of pregnancy, with 50 recipes.
Pregnancy has traditionally been viewed as a time when women can give in to their food cravings and not worry about their weight. But new research suggests that the foods women eat during pregnancy can have a lasting effect on the baby’s brain development and behavior, as well as the mother’s waistline. While many books tell women what not to eat, there are few guides that tell women what to eat while also considering that hormonal influences during pregnancy can make it difficult to stick to a healthy diet. More and more women enter pregnancy overweight, gain an unhealthy amount of weight while pregnant, then struggle to lose the “baby weight” after the baby is born. Drawing on the latest research from the fields of medicine, nutrition, and psychology, this guide gives moms-to-be a clear understanding of what their bodies really need and how those foods contribute to the development of healthy and happy babies.

The Pregnancy Diet
by Eileen Behan

Are you worried about gaining too much weight when you’re pregnant — or not losing enough weight after the baby arrives?
Let’s face it: to make sure you and your baby are as healthy as possible, you need to be concerned with eating right while you’re expecting. Yet a comprehensive guide to healthy weight gain — including a total pregnancy eating plan — hasn’t been made available to women. Until now.
In this first and only book of its kind, Eileen Behan, registered dietitian and mother of two, answers every imaginable question related to proper, healthy weight gain and the best nutrition for your baby, including exactly what to eat (and what not to eat) as well as how you can return to your pre-pregnancy weight after your baby’s birth.
Working hand-in-hand with your obstetrician’s advice, this wonderful book is chock full of helpful information (what to eat during morning sickness when you don’t want to eat at all), and facts you need to know (is a vegetarian diet safe for your baby?). Complete with an exciting eating program based on six easy-to-understand food groups — and delicious, healthy recipes that you’ll love, The Pregnancy Diet understands a woman’s real-life needs. You’ll find:

  • Weekly weight goals for single births and twins
  • Simple-to-make menus and nutrition-packed meals and snacks
  • Facts about aspartame, soft drinks, caffeine, alcohol, and smoking
  • Exercise programs — what’s safe and what’s not
  • Nutritional guidelines for special problems — gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, doctor-ordered bed rest, and others
  • The best food sources for the essential nutrients you need, including calcium, folic acid, iron, and many more!

At last: an all-in-one nutrition sourcebook for the time in your life when you want to make sure you do everything right.


Feed the Belly
by R. D. Frances Largeman-Roth

“Feed the Belly is overdue! If you are pregnant or living with someone who is, you will find this book to be invaluable to the pregnancy. It has knowledgeable information, great anecdotes, recipes and tips for navigating the challenges and surprises of pregnancy. Feed the Belly can help in creating a happier, healthier journey for the whole family.” –Cat Cora, the first female Iron Chef and author of Cooking from the Hip If you’ve got a bun in the oven… Feed the Belly is your healthy eating guidebook. The only eating guide for expectant moms that helps indulge cravings while giving baby–and mom–the essential nutrients they need, Feed the Belly offers a complete look at healthy eating for all nine months. Written by new mom and Health magazine editor and dietitian Frances Largeman-Roth, Feed the Belly covers: What to eat to get pregnant How to pick the right foods to make your baby smarter Where to get the nutrients you and your baby need Which are the safest seafood picks and when to choose organic How to choose the best fast food and easy on-the-go snacks Stay-fit secrets (yoga poses included!) Get started with a seven-day tear-out eating plan! With answers to all your pregnancy questions on nutrition, weight gain, food safety, and much more, Feed the Bellyoffers expectant moms something to sink their teeth into. Includes a foreword by Food Network Star Robin Miller and more than 65 easy-to-make recipes, organized by craving, including favorites from top chefs like Mark Bittman and Gale Gand

Dietary Reference Intakes for Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Vitamin B6, Folate, Vitamin B12, Pantothenic Acid, Biotin, and Choline
by Institute of Medicine, Food and Nutrition Board, A Report of the Standing Committee on the Scientific Evaluation of Dietary Reference Intakes and its Panel on Folate, Other B Vitamins, and Choline and Subcommittee on Upper Reference Levels of Nutrients

Since 1941, Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) has been recognized as the most authoritative source of information on nutrient levels for healthy people. Since publication of the 10th edition in 1989, there has been rising awareness of the impact of nutrition on chronic disease. In light of new research findings and a growing public focus on nutrition and health, the expert panel responsible for formulation RDAs reviewed and expanded its approach–the result: Dietary Reference Intakes.

This new series of references greatly extends the scope and application of previous nutrient guidelines. For each nutrient the book presents what is known about how the nutrient functions in the human body, what the best method is to determine its requirements, which factors (caffeine or exercise, for example) may affect how it works, and how the nutrient may be related to chronic disease.

This volume of the series presents information about thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, pantothenic acid, biotin, and choline.

Based on analysis of nutrient metabolism in humans and data on intakes in the U.S. population, the committee recommends intakes for each age group–from the first days of life through childhood, sexual maturity, midlife, and the later years. Recommendations for pregnancy and lactation also are made, and the book identifies when intake of a nutrient may be too much. Representing a new paradigm for the nutrition community, Dietary Reference Intakes encompasses:

  • Estimated Average Requirements (EARs). These are used to set Recommended Dietary Allowances.
  • Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs). Intakes that meet the RDA are likely to meet the nutrient requirement of nearly all individuals in a life-stage and gender group.
  • Adequate Intakes (AIs). These are used instead of RDAs when an EAR cannot be calculated. Both the RDA and the AI may be used as goals for individual intake.
  • Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (ULs). Intakes below the UL are unlikely to pose risks of adverse health effects in healthy people.

This new framework encompasses both essential nutrients and other food components thought to pay a role in health, such as dietary fiber. It incorporates functional endpoints and examines the relationship between dose and response in determining adequacy and the hazards of excess intake for each nutrient.


The Pregnancy Diet
by Eileen Behan

Are you worried about gaining too much weight when you’re pregnant — or not losing enough weight after the baby arrives?
Let’s face it: to make sure you and your baby are as healthy as possible, you need to be concerned with eating right while you’re expecting. Yet a comprehensive guide to healthy weight gain — including a total pregnancy eating plan — hasn’t been made available to women. Until now.
In this first and only book of its kind, Eileen Behan, registered dietitian and mother of two, answers every imaginable question related to proper, healthy weight gain and the best nutrition for your baby, including exactly what to eat (and what not to eat) as well as how you can return to your pre-pregnancy weight after your baby’s birth.
Working hand-in-hand with your obstetrician’s advice, this wonderful book is chock full of helpful information (what to eat during morning sickness when you don’t want to eat at all), and facts you need to know (is a vegetarian diet safe for your baby?). Complete with an exciting eating program based on six easy-to-understand food groups — and delicious, healthy recipes that you’ll love, The Pregnancy Diet understands a woman’s real-life needs. You’ll find:

  • Weekly weight goals for single births and twins
  • Simple-to-make menus and nutrition-packed meals and snacks
  • Facts about aspartame, soft drinks, caffeine, alcohol, and smoking
  • Exercise programs — what’s safe and what’s not
  • Nutritional guidelines for special problems — gestational diabetes, pregnancy-induced hypertension, doctor-ordered bed rest, and others
  • The best food sources for the essential nutrients you need, including calcium, folic acid, iron, and many more!

At last: an all-in-one nutrition sourcebook for the time in your life when you want to make sure you do everything right.


Real Food for Pregnancy
by Lily Nichols

Prenatal nutrition can be confusing. A lot of the advice you have been given about what to eat (or what not to eat) is well-meaning, but frankly, outdated or not evidenced-based. In Real Food for Pregnancy, you will get clear answers on what to eat and why, with research to back up every recommendation. Author and specialist in prenatal nutrition, Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, has taken a long and hard look at the science and discovered a wide gap between current prenatal nutrition recommendations and what foods are required for optimal health in pregnancy and for your baby’s development. There has never been a more comprehensive and well-referenced resource on prenatal nutrition. With Real Food for Pregnancy as your guide, you can be confident that your food and lifestyle choices support a smooth, healthy pregnancy.